Connecting the Dots

August 4, 2016

Majority of Canadian Workers Want More Insight on How Their Efforts Affect the Bottom Line

Toronto, ON.– When it comes to their jobs, new research reveals many professionals would like more information about how their efforts contribute to the company’s bottom line. While half of Canadian workers in the Robert Half Management Resources survey reported they are always able to see the connection between their duties and their firm’s performance, the majority, 58 per cent, also said they want greater insights. Eleven per cent of those polled noted they rarely or never see how their work affects the organization.

The findings uncovered different sentiments among age groups. Fifty-eight per cent of professionals 55 years of age and older consistently see how their work contributes to the company’s bottom line, and 52 per cent of those 35 to 54 years old agreed. Forty-nine per cent of respondents ages 18 to 34 said they are able to make the association between their efforts and organizational performance; this group also is the most likely to seek a greater understanding. 

Workers were asked, “How frequently, if at all, are you able to make the connection between your day-to-day duties and how they contribute to the company's bottom line?” Their responses:

 

All workers

18-34 years old

35-54 years old

55+ years old

Always

51%

49%

52%

58%

Sometimes

38%

43%

36%

27%

Rarely

8%

5%

10%

3%

Never

3%

2%

2%

12%

 

100%

99%*

100%

100%

* Total does not equal 100 per cent due to rounding.

Workers also were asked, “Do you wish you had more insight into the effects of your contributions on your company's bottom line?” Their responses:

 

All workers

18-34 years old

35-54 years old

55+ years old

Yes

58%

64%

53%

51%

No

42%

36%

47%

49%

 

100%

100%

100%

100%

“When employees can easily recognize the impact their roles have on the overall success of the company they work for, they are more likely to be motivated and able to make decisions with long-term business goals in mind,” said David King, Canadian president of Robert Half Management Resources.

“Employees of all levels benefit from better understanding the value of their contributions, and it’s up to senior management to ensure that this information is being shared,” added King. “Regular one-on-one or team meetings provide a forum for you and your staff to discuss everyone’s individual and collective projects, which helps ensure that all staff are working toward shared goals.”

Robert Half Management Resources highlights three ways employers can incorporate connecting individual roles to the bottom line into their staffing management:

  • Don’t stop at the top. Discussions about company performance and goals need to happen with staff members at all levels. Understanding how their role contributes to the organization can help employees boost their own performance.
  • Make the discussions ongoing. Managers should look for opportunities such as staff meetings, performance reviews and regular check-ins to communicate how individuals’ contributions benefit the business.
  • Tap external perspectives. Check with network contacts and consultants for their insights on how the company is faring and to learn best practices from other firms.

About the Research

The survey was developed by Robert Half Management Resources and conducted by an independent research firm. It includes responses from more than 400 Canadian workers 18 years of age or older and employed in office environments.

About Robert Half Management Resources
Robert Half Management Resources is the premier provider of senior-level finance, accounting and business systems professionals to supplement companies’ project and interim staffing needs. The company has more than 145 locations worldwide and offers assistance to business leaders and consultants at https://www.roberthalf.ca/management-resources. Follow us at https://www.roberthalf.ca/blog and @RobertHalf_CAN on Twitter for additional workplace advice and hiring trends.

For further information contact: Naz Araghian, (416) 865-2140, [email protected]