Statistics Canada September 2017 Labour Force Survey Report

By October 13, 2017 at 11:54am

Canada added 10,000 jobs in September, and the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 6.2 per cent. As revealed in the most recent Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey, this rate continues to match the lowest reported since October 2008.

Highlights in September

  • Gains in full-time employment (+112,000) in September were mostly offset by declines in part time (-102,000) employment. In August, there was a decline in the number of people working full time and an increase in part time.
  • In the 12 months to September, employment rose by 320,000 (+1.8 per cent), spurred by gains in full-time employment (+289,000 or +2.0 per cent). Over this period, the number of hours worked increased by 2.4 per cent.
  • Overall employment grew by 43,000 (+0.2 per cent) in the third quarter, slower than the 0.6 per cent growth rate in the second quarter and the 0.5 per cent growth rate of the first quarter of 2017.

Regional Highlights

Ontario led provincial employment gains in the month of September:

  • In Ontario, employment rose by 35,000, the fourth overall increase in five months, driven primarily by full-time positions. Although the unemployment rate was little changed in September (at 5.6 per cent), compared with 12 months earlier, employment was up by 170,000 (+2.4 per cent).
  • For the third consecutive month, employment in Quebec was also little changed. However employment rose by 54,000 (+1.3 per cent) in the 12 months to September, and the unemployment rate fell by 0.9 per cent to 6.0 per cent.

Hiring Trends and Career Tips

We’re full swing into fall, and with students across the country settling into their school year, now might be a good time for professionals to likewise consider integrating a little education into their own schedules. If you’re an employee, enhancing your skills with additional courses, seminars or certificates can give you the edge when it comes to negotiating a higher salary, or landing a new position. For employers, offering educational opportunities for your staff can be a key factor in attracting skilled candidates who want to grow, developing future leaders, and keeping morale and retention high.

As a professional, if you’re looking for a development opportunity that isn’t available at your company, or your boss doesn’t actively offer it to employees, build a business case to present to your manager. Be ready to show how your development will help the company. For example, could it enable you to assist with a new systems conversion or update your team on new regulations? Will it make it easier to collaborate with teams across the business?

Professionals want to work for a firm that will prioritize and support their career growth, and it’s in a company’s best interest to make it possible for them. Whether their budgets are spiking or diving, companies need to ensure they have solid professional development programs in place. It’s about more than designing a training curriculum or enhancing individual performance – education is a key competitive differentiator in recruiting and retaining talented staff looking to continually improve their skills.

Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey September 2017

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