Statistics Canada July 2018 Labour Force Survey Report

By August 20, 2018 at 11:22am

In July, employment reportedly increased by 54,000 jobs while the unemployment rate fell (0.2 percentage points) to 5.8 per cent, according to the most recent Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey Report.  

 

Highlights in July

  • Employment increase in July driven by gains in part-time work.
  • In the 12 months to July, employment grew by 246,000 (+1.3 per cent), largely the result of an increase in full-time work (+211,000, or +1.4 per cent).
  • Over the same period, total hours worked grew by 1.3 per cent.
  • Adjusted to U.S. concepts, the unemployment rate in Canada was 4.8 per cent in July, compared with 3.9 per cent in the United States.
     

Regional Highlights 

 

Ontario and British Columbia recorded employment increases in July. At the same time, the number of workers declined in Manitoba, while it was little changed in the other provinces.

  • Employment rose by 61,000 in Ontario, with all the increase in part-time work. The unemployment rate in the province fell 0.5 percentage points to 5.4 per cent, matching the most recent low recorded in July 2000. Compared with July 2017, employment grew by 183,000 (+2.6 per cent).
       
  • In British Columbia, the number of people working grew by 11,000. Unemployment in the province was at 5.0 per cent, little changed on a year-over-year basis.
        
  • In Alberta, employment held steady as a decrease in full-time work was largely offset by an increase in the number of people working part time. The unemployment rate was little changed at 6.7 per cent. On a year-over-year basis, employment in the province rose 40,000 (+1.7 per cent), all in full-time work.
     

Hiring Trends and Career Tips 
These days, it’s not all work and no play for Canadian workers. In a recent survey by Robert Half, more than two-thirds (69 per cent) of professionals across Canada said they’ve achieved a good to excellent work-life balance. And it’s only improving: 35 per cent think it’s getting better compared to three years ago.

In another Robert Half survey, nearly nine in 10 respondents (87 per cent) reported that their manager is very or somewhat supportive of their efforts to achieve work-life balance. And 64 per cent of Canadian workers said their boss sets a good or an excellent example of how to maintain a better balance.

For managers who want to help their employees achieve work-life balance, popular offerings include telecommuting, flexible hours, alternative work schedules and flextime. For employees struggling to achieve better work-life balance, here are a few tips:

  • Define what work-life balance means on an individual level. Consider your career and personal objectives. What level of balance do you need to reach your goals?
  • Communicate with your manager. Discuss your goals and demonstrate how the changes you’d like to implement would not just benefit you but would benefit the team (i.e. more productive, better focused, less stressed).
  • Fine-tune as necessary. If your current work-life balance strategy isn’t working, try something else. Change your schedule or your work-from-home day. Your manager may have additional options to consider.
  • Unplug from work. When you take time off, avoid the temptation to check in with the office. Use your personal time for personal pursuits. You and your employer want you to return to work rested and productive.